In Simple English...Glen Breton Rare 14 Year Old Single Malt Whisky

Glenora

Tasting notes

Colour:  Pale Gold.

Nose:  Green apple, fresh cut flowers, honey, maple flavoured oatmeal.

Taste:  Green apple dipped in chocolate, vanilla, sweet confectionary notes.

Finish:  Medium long.

A few distilled words

Apologies for starting this review with a “Well, duh!” statement; however, here goes:  Building your own distillery is more than a just a backyard project.  Now, throw in the Scotch Whisky Association trying to stop you from using the name you want to use for your whisky.  Say whaaaat?  That’s the story behind Glen Breton whisky from the Glenora Distillery on Cape Breton Island.  The SWA wanted to keep the word “Glen” from being used because of its connotation to scotch.  Eventually, Glenora won the case and Glen Breton was finally able to be trademarked.  Woohoo!

All that, thankfully, is whisky under the bridge now so let’s get to it.  Glen Breton is billed as North America’s first single malt whisky.  The first release was an 8 year old expression.  Now, they have 13 releases in their lineup including the 14 year old which we’re about to dive into.

You know those kiddy romper rooms that have a pool full of plastic balls that kids jump in?  Great.  Now, replace the balls with green apples.  That’s what says hello right away.  Winey green apples.  Bright and cheerful, the 14 year old Rare seems to have enjoyed its time in the casks.  There’s no rebellion in this teen; the flavours here are soft and well rounded.  (I don’t remember being like that at 14 but that’s another story.)  This 14 year old isn’t overly complex either but again, I wasn’t either at that age.  But perhaps that’s a good thing.  Instead of yammering on with puffed up pretentions, the 14 year old Rare says what it has to say plainly, directly and succinctly with this nosing.  Moving to the sipping part, the liquid silk glides over the tongue with a quick how-do-you-do and slowly fades away at the back of the throat.  Again, sweetly, directly and simply.

William Shakespeare’s first line in Sonnet 18 was: “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?”  Now, I’m not prone to speaking in Elizabethan English, except for dealing with persistent telemarketers, mind you.  Thee notwithstanding, I find the comparison apt:  Sunny, summer days aren’t complicated.  They are what they are and are meant to be enjoyed.  The same goes for the 14 year old Rare.  Enjoy it without making it complicated.  Cheers.

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WQO Score: 75

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